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Clark County health officer on J&J vaccine pause: ‘This should build trust, not erode it’

The Johnson & Johnson single-dose remains in limbo after U.S. health advisers told the government Wednesday that they need more evidence to decide if a handful of unusual blood clots were linked to the shot — and if so, how big the potential risk really is.It was found that 6 people, of nearly 7 million who got the shot, developed a clot. One of those people died. While that number is extremely low, the 6 cases raised an alarm bell because that number is at least three times more than experts would have expected to see even more typical brain-drainage clots, a CDC doctor said.(In video above, related — Kentucky halts use of J&J)So how worried should people be?Clark County Health Officer Dr. Eric Yazel said the vaccine pause should give people more faith in the process — not less. He explained this in a lengthy Facebook post following the announcement.He explained some of the facts about who was affected and then said, “Sounds very scary, especially to some of my friends and family that have gotten the vaccine. Let’s take a deep breath and a second to digest.”Yazel explained what he thinks is happening during the pause and how it should help people trust the vaccine process:”#1 go back to that first number, 6 out of 6.8 million. So basically if every person in the Metro Louisville area got this vaccine, we could expect to see one case as of now. I am not minimizing this, but I do think it is important to understand the true incidence of this. “#2 as a medical provider, we are much more likely to do advanced imaging on someone with an abnormal headache after getting a new vaccine. How much of this is us capturing a side effect of the vaccine vs catching something that happens naturally because we are taking more pictures? I think that is one of the questions they are trying to answer with this pause. “#3 If you look at this objectively, this should build trust in the process, not erode it. At the end of the day, Johnson and Johnson is on hold because of a side effect that is literally less than 1 in a million. This should tell you how serious the Public Health community is taking your health at the federal, state, and local level. We will make sure we continue to keep everyone updated as I’m sure more information will coming out in the next few days, weeks.”Read the full post here.

CLARK COUNTY, Ind. —

The Johnson & Johnson single-dose remains in limbo after U.S. health advisers told the government Wednesday that they need more evidence to decide if a handful of unusual blood clots were linked to the shot — and if so, how big the potential risk really is.

It was found that 6 people, of nearly 7 million who got the shot, developed a clot. One of those people died. While that number is extremely low, the 6 cases raised an alarm bell because that number is at least three times more than experts would have expected to see even more typical brain-drainage clots, a CDC doctor said.

(In video above, related — Kentucky halts use of J&J)

So how worried should people be?

Clark County Health Officer Dr. Eric Yazel said the vaccine pause should give people more faith in the process — not less. He explained this in a lengthy Facebook post following the announcement.

He explained some of the facts about who was affected and then said, “Sounds very scary, especially to some of my friends and family that have gotten the vaccine. Let’s take a deep breath and a second to digest.”

Yazel explained what he thinks is happening during the pause and how it should help people trust the vaccine process:

“#1 go back to that first number, 6 out of 6.8 million. So basically if every person in the Metro Louisville area got this vaccine, we could expect to see one case as of now. I am not minimizing this, but I do think it is important to understand the true incidence of this.

“#2 as a medical provider, we are much more likely to do advanced imaging on someone with an abnormal headache after getting a new vaccine. How much of this is us capturing a side effect of the vaccine vs catching something that happens naturally because we are taking more pictures? I think that is one of the questions they are trying to answer with this pause.

“#3 If you look at this objectively, this should build trust in the process, not erode it. At the end of the day, Johnson and Johnson is on hold because of a side effect that is literally less than 1 in a million. This should tell you how serious the Public Health community is taking your health at the federal, state, and local level. We will make sure we continue to keep everyone updated as I’m sure more information will coming out in the next few days, weeks.”

Read the full post here.

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